Browsing articles in "Security"
Monday 18th July 2016 - 7:17 pm
Comments Off on Tony Abbott:off the team

Tony Abbott:off the team

by Alan Thornhill

Tony Abbott has missed out on a place in Malcolm Turnbull’s new ministry and Christopher Pyne is to become Australia’s new minister for defence industry.

 

The Prime Minister has also named Josh Frydenberg Australia’s new environment minister.

 

This has angered environmentalists who say Mr Frydenberg has always favoured the  coal industry over the Great Barrier Reef.

 

Mr Turnbull’s new ministry and cabinet are to be sworn in next week.

 

The Prime Minister’s decision to leave his predecessor, Mr Abbott, off his front bench comes as no surprise, even though hard right MPs, within the Liberal Party, would have welcomed such a move.

 

As he  promised do before the election, Mr Turnbull generally avoided unecssary changes changes when he announced his new team today.

 

But Mr Frydenberg will become minister for the environment and energy.

 

Mr Turnbull said all his previous cabinet ministers had been reappointed although there had been some changes and expansions in their duties.

 

He said:  “Senator Fiona Nash will add Local Government and Territories to her Regional Development and Regional Communications roles.

 

“Christopher Pyne will be appointed to the new role of Minister for Defence Industry, within the Defence portfolio.

 

“Mr Pyne will be responsible for overseeing our new Defence Industry Plan that came out of the Defence White Paper.

 

“This includes the most significant naval shipbuilding program since the Second World War.

 

“This is a key national economic development role. This program is vitally important for the future of Australian industry and especially advanced manufacturing.

 

“The Minister for Defence Industry will oversee the Naval Shipbuilding Plan which will itself create 3,600 new direct jobs and thousands more across the supply chain across Australia.

 

“Beyond shipbuilding, there is a massive Defence Industry Investment and Acquisition Program on land, in the air and inside cyberspace.

 

“This is a massive step change set out in the Defence White Paper. This investment in Defence Industry, as you know, is a key part of our economic plan.

 

“It will drive the jobs and the growth in advanced manufacturing, in technology, right across the country. And I’m appointing Christopher to be the Minister to oversee that and ensure that those projects are delivered.

 

“As I said at the outset, this is a term of government for delivery.

 

“We will be judged in 2019 by the Australian people as to whether we have delivered on the plans and the programs and the investments that we have promised and set out and described in the lead-up to the election.

 

Greg Hunt will move from Environment to become the Minister for Industry, Innovation and Science, where he will drive the National Innovation and Science Agenda.

 

“Can I say that Mr Hunt has been an outstanding Environment Minister and he served in that portfolio in Government and indeed, in opposition.

 

“He has a keen understanding of innovation, he has a keen understanding of science and technology and he will give new leadership to that important portfolio and those important agendas so central to our economic plan.

 

“Josh Frydenberg will move to the expanded Environment and Energy portfolio combining all the key energy policy areas.

 

“These include energy security and domestic energy markets for which he has been previously responsible in the current portfolio. Renewable energy targets, clean energy development and financing and emission reduction mechanisms which are part of Environment.

 

“Senator Matt Canavan will be promoted to Cabinet as the Minister for Resources and Northern Australia and I welcome Senator Canavan to the Cabinet in this key economic development role,” Mr Turnbull said.

 

 

 

 

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Monday 4th July 2016 - 8:46 am
Comments Off on Australia’s next PM? The one who is better on the blower

Australia’s next PM? The one who is better on the blower

by Alan Thornhill

Australia’s political leaders will be hitting their phones this week, trying to scrape together enough support to give the country stable government for the next three years.

 

The main rivals, Prime Minister, Malcolm Turnbull, who heads a conservative coalition and Bill Shorten, who leads the Labor party both found themselves short of the 76 seats they would need, in the House of Representatives, to govern in their own right, at the end of the initial, but still incomplete, count.

 

Late yesterday, Labor had 67 seats, the Coalition 65, others 5 and 13 were still in doubt.

 

The Australian Electoral Commission had counted 78.2 per cent of the votes cast, at that point.

 

It will not resume the count until Tuesday, and the final result, for the House, will probably not be known until some time next week.

 

Mr Turnbull had made much of the need he saw for stability, during the late stages of the eight week election campaign, particularly after Britain’s vote to leave the EU.
However the swing to Labor, evident in Saturday’s election, showed that voters were more impressed with Mr Shorten’s warning that only Labor could be trusted to protect Australia’s health insurance system, Medicare.

 

Mr Turnbull had sought support for a plan centred on tax cuts for big companies and high income earners.

 

He had warned that a big spending Labor government could not be trusted to manage Australia’s economy responsibly.

 

And, at a news conference today, he welcomed a question from a reporter who asked him if the election result could threaten Australia’s TripleA credit rating.
He thanked the reporter and said: “This is why it is very important … for me to explain what is happening at the moment.”

 

“We are simply going through a process of completing a count,” Mr Turnbull said.

 

The Prime Minister also said that he could still form a new government, for the next three years.

 

However Bill Shorten greeted the initial count with a triumphal declaration.

 

He conceded that the public might not know the outcome of Saturday’s election : “…for some days to come.”

 

“But there is one thing for sure – the Labor Party is back.” he said.

 

But which of these two men is likely to be Australia’s Prime Minister over the next three years?

 

The answer to that question will depend, very much, on their relative telephone skills.

Monday 27th June 2016 - 9:17 am
Comments Off on PM’s speech: the lustre and bluster

PM’s speech: the lustre and bluster

by Alan Thornhill

Anlysis

 

 

 

Malcolm Turnbull’s policy speech yesterday was a polished performance.

 

He managed to suggest, for example, that something very like the Brexit disaster could well sink Australia, too, if we don’t vote the right way on July 2.

 

Without actually saying so.

 

So is there a danger, in his message that might not be immediately apparent?

 

Arguably.

 

Is the lustre, of his carefully crafted message, for example, brighter than its bluster?

 

The Prime Minister assured voters, constantly, throughout his speech, that his Coalition has a plan to deal with all eventualities, that might arise over the next three years.

 

Without saying, too specifically, what it was

 

He also boasted that some 300,000 new jobs had been created, on his government’s watch.

 

Without mentioning that most of them are part time positions, with pay rates that don’t cover grocery bills

 

This has left many Australians, particularly the young and the old, without a place in Australia’s modern work-force

 

So it might well be worth looking again at just what the Turnbull forces are planning to do, as well as what Mr Turnbull, himself, is actually saying.

 

Tax cuts, both for Australians on high incomes – and the big corporates – are at the heart of his plan.

 

It may well be worth remembering, at this point, that much of the vote for Britain’s exit, from the EU, came from poor areas, in Britain’s north.

 

That is  from the very people who have suffered most, over the years, from the austerity that came with Thatcherism, and its successors.

 

Eminent economists, like America’s Paul Krugman are not impressed by arguments that rising wealth for the rich will produce more jobs for the poor.

 

Krugman says that’s like relying on “the austerity fairy” to overcome unemployment.

 

However that argument still appeals, even if its strongest appeal is to those who benefit most from it.

Friday 10th June 2016 - 12:08 pm
Comments Off on Why we risked all:PM

Why we risked all:PM

by Alan Thornhill

The Prime Minister, Malcolm Turnbull, is trying to steer the election campaign back to where it started.

That is with his attempt to restore peace in the building and construction industry.

And in a speech to the American Australian Association & US Studies Centre last night, Mr Turnbull also argued that Australia’s increasing involvement with Asia is making this country’s reliance on America more important than ever.

He said the government had launched an unusually long –eight week – campaign for re-election  “in order to break the deadlock between the House of

Representatives and the Senate over two critical pieces of legislation relating to industrial relations.

“and one of those is the restoration of the Australian Building and Construction Commission,”  Mr Turnbull said.

That aim had – previously – been hardly mentioned during the campaign, which has now passed its half-way mark.

But, last night,  Mr Turnbull declared that the course he had chosen is: “the only way we can get the rule of law restored to the construction sector.”

He said the sector  employs one million people.

“ and the restoration of law to that sector is a vital economic reform, and part of our economic plan to secure our prosperity.”

“the only way we can get that passed is through this double dissolution and getting the numbers collectively in the House and the Senate to pass that law and restore rule of law through a joint sitting of the parliament,” Mr Turnbull said.

“ That’s our commitment,” he added.

Mr Tunbull also paid tribute to a previous Liberal Prime Minister, John Howard, who attended last night’s function.

He said: “John understood that the United States is the irreplaceable anchor to the global rules-based order – an order built upon shared political values and common economic and security interests.

“The truth of his insight has been affirmed by every subsequent Prime Minister of Australia.

“Earlier this year I visited and thanked our men and women serving alongside US forces in Afghanistan, in what is now the longest commitment in our military history.

“And also our forces in Iraq, where we are together with the United States and other allies jointly pushing back, rolling back the brutality and barbarity of Daesh or ISIL.

“And not a day, truthfully not a minute, goes by without our intelligence agencies working together – saving lives – in the fight against terrorism.

“Our ANZUS alliance and broader relationship is anchored in a history that is even deeper and richer than many of us realise,” Mr Turnbull concluded.

Sunday 5th June 2016 - 7:13 pm
Comments Off on Labor “a risk” PM

Labor “a risk” PM

by Alan Thornhill

The Prime Minister, Malcolm Turnbull, says the election of a Labor government is now the only risk to the creation of new jobs in South Australia.

Campaigning on Adelaide Sunday, Mr Turnbull spoke of the new jobs he said would appear in that state, as the Federal government’s submarine building program gets under way.

“The only risk to these jobs starting immediately this year is Labor,” the Prime Minister said.

“Labor failed to commission a single naval ship from an Australian yard in six years of government.

“Labor cut more than $18 billion from defence funding and delayed more than 100 projects.

“Risking critical gaps in capability, Labor’s neglect plunged naval shipbuilding in South Australia into the notorious valley of death.

The Prime Minister said:“ South Australians should think very carefully about whether we can afford more Labor delays and cancellations.”

He said: “Now, our GDP, our economy grew 3.1 per cent in the year to March, faster than any of the G7 economies and well above the OECD average.

“That doesn’t happen by accident.

“You need a clear plan.

“You need strong economic leadership.

’You need a pro-growth, pro-business agenda that drives investment and jobs.

“In the last calendar year, 300,000 new jobs were created and two thirds of these were women.

Mr Turnbull said: “450,000 jobs have been created since the last election.

“But we can and must do more.

We are strongly positioned to gain from growth in the large, dynamic economies of Asia.

“Our export trade deals with China, Korea and Japan are giving farmers a competitive edge and opening doors for our service industries into those expanding markets, Mr Turnbull said.

Tuesday 24th November 2015 - 12:55 pm
Comments Off on National security:the PM speaks

National security:the PM speaks

by Alan Thornhill

This is the statement on national security that the PM Malcolm Turnbull has just made to Federal parliament.

 

THE PRIME MINISTER

 MALCOLM TURNBULL

 PRIME MINISTER

 

Mr Speaker,

 

When innocent people are dying at the hands of violent extremists, no matter where in the world this is happening, hard questions are asked of societies like our own — hard questions for which there are no easy answers.

 

For all freedom-loving nations, the message could not be clearer: if we want to preserve the values that underpin our open, democratic societies, we will have to work resolutely with each other to defend and protect the freedoms we hold dear.

 

Following the recent mass killings of innocent civilians in Paris and around the world, I take this opportunity to update the House on Australia’s global, regional and domestic policies to respond to terrorist attacks.

 

Let me start by once again expressing my condolences to all the victims. Our hearts go out to the families who have lost their loved ones and to those recovering from their injuries.

 

We should grieve and we should be angry.

 

But we must not let grief or anger cloud our judgment. Our response must be as clear eyed and strategic as it is determined.

 

This is not a time for gestures or machismo.

 

Calm, clinical, professional, effective.

 

That’s how we defeat this menace.

 

The threat from ISIL is a global problem that must be addressed at its source, in the Middle East, by ensuring our involvement in coalition efforts in Syria and Iraq is resolute and effective.

 

ISIL aims to overthrow all the existing governments in Muslim societies, and beyond. It regards as apostates any who will not submit to its own perverted view of Islam.

 

Strategically, ISIL wants to create division by fomenting resentment between non-Muslim populations and Muslims.

 

ISIL emerged as an extremist, terrorist group out of Al Qaeda in Iraq and Syria. Their territorial gains in Syria and Iraq have fed into their narrative of conquest.

 

By most measures, however, ISIL is in a fundamentally weak position.

 

We must not be fooled by its hype. Its ideology is archaic, but its use of the Internet is very modern. ISIL has many more smartphones than guns, more twitter accounts than fighters.

 

It does not command broad-based legitimacy even in those areas under its direct control. It is encircled by hostile forces. It is under military pressure.

 

And, through its depraved actions, ISIL has strengthened the resolve of the global community, including Russia, to defeat it.

 

The 60 nation-strong coalition’s objective is to disrupt, degrade and ultimately to defeat ISIL. This will require a patient, painstaking full spectrum strategy. Not just military, but financial, diplomatic and political.

 

This involves a combination of air strikes in both Syria and Iraq and support and training for Iraq’s army.

 

Australia’s contribution to coalition forces on the ground in Iraq is second only to that of the United States and large relative to our population and proximity to the conflict.

 

Larger, for example, than any European nation, larger than Canada or any of the neighbouring Arab States.

 

We have six FA-18s involved in missions in that theatre, with 240 personnel in the air task group, 90 special forces advisers, and around 300 soldiers training the Iraqi army at Taji.

 

The special forces are authorised by our Government to advise and assist Iraq’s Counter-Terrorism Service in the field at headquarters level.

 

However the Government of Iraq has not consented to any of our defence forces being deployed outside the wire on ground combat operations.

 

The Government of Iraq believes that large scale Western troop operations in its country would be counterproductive.

 

Australia’s servicemen and women are making a significant contribution to the Coalition campaign and we will continue to support our allies as our strategies evolve in what is likely to be an extended campaign.

 

In Iraq, ISIL’s momentum has been halted.

 

Its capabilities degraded.

 

Kurdish and Iraqi forces have won back territory with coalition support.

 

I have to report to the House that the consensus of the leaders I met at the G20, at APEC and at the East Asia Summit is that there is no support currently for a large US-led Western army to attempt to conquer and hold ISIL-controlled areas.

 

In Syria, the broader conflict and the absence of a central government that the West can work with makes action against ISIL even more complicated.

 

Following the destruction of the Russian airliner over the Sinai and the Paris attack, Russia and France have raised their operational tempo against ISIL.

 

Ultimately a political solution is needed in Syria. Only this would allow attention to turn more fully to eliminating ISIL as a military force. We support the negotiations in Vienna to find a pathway to a political resolution in Syria.

 

Under the circumstances I have outlined, and mindful that Australia has a range of security priorities across the globe and in our own region, there are currently no plans for a significant change in the level or the nature of Australia’s military commitment in Iraq and Syria.

 

No such change has been sought by our allies – if one were we would of course carefully consider it.

 

We will always proceed on the basis of the considered advice of our military professionals in the Australian Defence Force, just as we rely on the advice of our counter-terrorism experts domestically.

 

Current advice to the Government is that the unilateral deployment of Australian combat troops on the ground in Iraq or Syria is not feasible or practical.

 

As a supplement to our already significant military commitment, our interests – and those of the countries and people in the region – are served by supporting stability in countries neighbouring Iraq and Syria, particularly Jordan. We will continue to look for ways to further strengthen cooperation with Jordan.

 

The rise of ISIL and the conflict in Syria have increased the threat environment in Southeast Asia. I have discussed this issue at the East Asia Summit and in depth with the leaders of Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Singapore.

 

We are working more closely than ever to share intelligence and counter messaging strategies.

 

From an Australian perspective, we see a real risk that terrorist groups in the region might be inspired by attacks such as we have seen in Ankara, Beirut, Bamako and Paris and we are very

mindful of the fact that hundreds of thousands of Australians visit Southeast Asia every year, for business, study or holidays.

 

Just as Australia cannot fight any military conflict against ISIL unilaterally, we cannot counter violent extremism alone, particularly online. In my recent discussions with regional colleagues at the East Asia Summit and APEC I further committed Australia as a leading partner in this area.

 

We look forward to supporting the new Malaysian counter messaging centre and to further cooperation with Indonesia, beginning with the Attorney-General and Minister for Justice, who is also the Minister assisting me on Counter Terrorism, shortly taking up an offer to visit Indonesia in December to hold discussions focused on furthering our countering terrorism and violent extremism efforts in the region.

 

The Paris attacks demonstrate ISIL has an ability to launch concerted attacks in Western cities. It was also a reminder that, while coordinated, there is not much sophisticated planning required for armed fanatics to slaughter unarmed civilians with military assault rifles and suicide vests.

 

As Prime Minister, and speaking on behalf of the heads of ASIO and the AFP, as well as the Chief of the Defence Force, I want Australians to be aware that a terrorist incident on our soil remains likely but also that Australians should be reassured our security agencies are working diligently and expertly to prevent that happening.

 

In addition to being the most successful multicultural society in the world, Australia, as an island continent, has some natural advantages over Europe, which is currently facing the uncontrolled movement of hundreds of thousands of people.

 

Unlike the Europeans we are in control of our borders. For example, people who successfully enter Greece are moving at will throughout much of the EU.

 

We are an island nation. The people smugglers’ business model has been broken. The boats have been stopped.

 

We also have very strong gun laws that make access to weapons more difficult and play a vital role in keeping our public safe.

 

As your Prime Minister my highest duty, and that of my government, is to keep Australians safe.

 

We cannot eliminate entirely the risk of terrorism any more than we can eliminate the risk of any serious crime.  But we can mitigate it. We will continue to thwart and frustrate many attacks before they occur.

 

We are examining closely the implications of the Paris attacks for our own domestic arrangements. I am receiving updated intelligence on this every day. We are working more closely than ever with our European partners.

 

Public safety is the highest priority. And a major part of this is to be as open and transparent with Australians as possible about both the threat and what everyone can do to help.

 

In September last year, the alert level was raised to HIGH, and it has remained there ever since. We have subsequently seen terror attacks against police officers in Melbourne, the Sydney Siege and the murder of a police worker in Parramatta by a radicalised young man.

 

The tempo of our domestic counter terrorism efforts has increased and our capabilities have been tested. Since September 2014, 26 people have been charged as a result of 10 counter terrorism operations around Australia.  That’s more than one-third of all terrorism related charges since 2001. Counter Terrorism Units at our airports are also stopping people leaving for, and returning from, the conflict zone.

 

The fact that there has to date been no mass casualty attack owes much to the vigilance of our security agencies.

 

ASIO and the Federal Police have advised me that there is no evidence that the recent attacks, including Paris, will materially affect the threat level in Australia but we are constantly on watch for any evolving or emerging threats.

 

The Council of Australian Governments agreed in July to develop a new threat advisory system to make it clearer to the public what our security experts believe to be the current threat from terrorism.

 

The new framework, recommended by ASIO, has been subject to extensive consultation and review.

 

I can inform the House that the National Threat Assessment Centre (or NTAC) that sits within ASIO will this week transition to the new National Terrorism Threat Advisory System.

 

The new system will provide the public with more information on the nature of the threat we are facing. The adoption of a five-tiered threat system will also provide ASIO with greater flexibility in determining threat levels, reflecting the need to adapt to an evolving security environment.

 

Rapid developments in communications technology present both opportunities and challenges for our agencies; modern messaging and voice applications are generally encrypted in transit. Human intelligence, relationships with communities, are more important than ever.

 

I have therefore asked that ASIO and other relevant agencies work with our international intelligence partners to address the challenge of monitoring terrorist groups in this new environment.

 

I will be meeting with my State and Territory colleagues next month. Co-operation between all tiers of government and state and federal agencies is vital in the counter-terrorism effort.

 

At COAG on December 11, I will continue our discussions with Premiers on how to best counter violent extremism. I will raise with them initiatives under consideration to address the problem of radicalisation in prisons.

 

I have also asked that our law enforcement agencies test their responses to a mass casualty attack.  Such an attack leaves little, if any, room for negotiation.

 

This work is in addition to the extensive reform of our national security laws which has already seen the introduction of five tranches of legislation. These laws ensure our agencies have all the tools required in the effort to keep us safe.

 

Within Australia, our Counter-Terrorism Strategy calls for partnerships between all levels of government, community and the private sector.

 

It emphasises the need to limit the spread and influence of violent extremist ideas.

 

The root cause of the current threat we face is a perverted strain of Islamist extremist ideology. Not all extremism ends in violence but all politically motivated violence begins with extremist ideology.

 

Any war with ISIL is not just one in a military sense, but also a war of ideas. Through their extensive use of social media, they seek the maximum propaganda advantage from any territorial gains as cover for their fundamental military weakness and the barbaric nature of their mindset.

 

The Government’s investment in Countering Violent Extremism programs has tripled over the past four years to more than $40 million.

 

The Government’s approach has four tiers:

 

  • maintaining a strong, multicultural society
  • helping institutions and sectors of our community combat violent extremist ideology where it emerges
  • challenging and undermining the appeal of terrorist propaganda, especially online, and
  • intervening to divert individuals away from their violent extremist views.

 

Importantly, governments cannot win this battle alone. Community leaders and groups have great responsibility both in denouncing violent extremism and teaching unity in diversity, mutual respect instead of hatred.

 

The condemnation of ISIL and the promotion of authentic, modern and tolerant Islam by the leaders of big majority Muslim nations – including Indonesia, Turkey and Malaysia –  has been especially important.

 

To this end, I thank all those Muslim groups and leaders who made statements denouncing the Paris attacks.

 

A strong and trusting relationship between the government and communities is crucial to ensuring the right messages reach the hearts and minds of those who might be vulnerable to the propaganda of terror groups.

 

Part of the message is promoting the truth that Australia not only does its part in the military coalition to defeat ISIL but in the humanitarian cause.

 

Australia has committed to accepting over four years an additional 12,000 people who have fled the conflicts in Syria and Iraq. Australia has also provided around $230 million in humanitarian assistance since 2011 to support Syrians and Iraqis affected by the conflict.

 

This is a significant humanitarian initiative by Australians. We have one of the strongest records of any nation for resettling people facing persecution in their homelands. Since the end of World War Two, Australia has resettled more than 825,000 refugees and others in humanitarian need.

 

The focus of the 12,000 intake of Syrian and Iraqi refugees is on persecuted minorities and those assessed as being most vulnerable – women, children and families with the least prospect of returning to their homes.

 

All applications are rigorously assessed on an individual basis – in line with Australia’s existing refugee and humanitarian policies.

 

Our national security interest is always the first and abiding priority.

 

Strict security, health and character checks will not be compromised.

 

In Iraq and Syria, ISIL must be defeated militarily – enabled by  a durable political settlement in both countries that will reduce the capacity of the extremists to recruit and mobilise.

 

The threat of ISIL-inspired terrorism must be addressed through domestic, regional and global counter-terrorism efforts; as an ideological threat, it needs to be confronted globally.

 

There are no quick fixes.

 

We will redouble our efforts in support of domestic and regional counter-terrorism efforts.

 

Across the region, our engagement will intensify, pursuing collective counter-terrorism objectives by better prioritising and coordinating with regional partners.

 

We will defeat these terrorists.

 

And the strongest weapons we bring to this battle are ourselves, our values, our way of life.

 

Our unity mocks their attempts to divide us.

 

Our freedom under law mocks their cruel tyranny.

 

Our mutual respect mocks their bitter intolerance.

 

And the strength of our free people will see off these thugs and tyrants as it has seen off so many of their kind before

Wednesday 29th July 2015 - 7:52 am
Comments Off on Time for a cyber check? See what the report says

Time for a cyber check? See what the report says

by Alan Thornhill

Australian Security agencies are under constant cyber threat.

So are “other organisations.”

The Australian Cyber Security Centre will warn of both risks in a report it will release later today.

Its Co-ordinator, Clive Lines, said that the Australian Cyber Security Centre Threat Report 2015 clearly demonstrates that the cyber threat to Australian organisations is undeniable, unrelenting and continues to grow.

“The report provides an overarching view of cyber adversaries, what they want, and how they go about getting it from an ACSC perspective.”

“We envisage the report will be a useful resource for organisations to start an informed conversation about protecting their vital information.”

“If every Australian organisation read this report and acted to improve their security posture, we would see a far more informed and secure Australian internet presence,” he said.

All ACSC partner agencies provided information for Australian organisations about the threats their networks face from cyber espionage, cyber attacks and cybercrime.

The report also contains mitigation and remediation information to assist organisations to prevent and respond to the threat.

This report demonstrates the ACSC’s commitment to provide targeted and actionable information that can be accessed and used by those who need it.

The report is available on the ACSC website.

More Information: acsc.gov.au

Tuesday 14th July 2015 - 7:22 am
Comments Off on Turnbull urges cool assessment of Daesh threat

Turnbull urges cool assessment of Daesh threat

by Alan Thornhill

Malcolm Turnbull called tonight for a cool, objective assessment of the threat posed by Daesh, in televised remarks seen as more veiled criticism of the Prime Minister, Tony Abbott.

He said Australians “need to be very objective, very measured and very balanced” in what they say about Islamic State or Daesh.

Mr Abbott has been much less restrained in his warnings of the dangers posed by Islamic State.

He told told a conference in Sydney last month that – if it could – IS – or Daesh – would come for every person and government with one message: “Submit or die”.

“This is terrorism with global ambitions.” Mr Abbott said then.

Mr Abbott has also placed IS among the greatest threats Australia has ever faced.

However appearing on the ABC’s 7.30 Report tonight, the Communications Minister said “there is in politics, often, a vocabulary of hyperbole, whereby:-

“…there is never a problem:there is always a massive problem.”

“…there is never a threat:it is always the biggest threat you have ever encountered.”

But with DAESH, they are seeking to recruit, Mr Turnbull said.

“including recruiting Australians.

“and one of the things they use is the image of triumph:”the image of invincibility.”

Mr Turnbull said Daesh wants people to believe that they are concrete, they are powerful and they are frightening the West.

“So the bigger they can appear, the more successful they think they will be with their recruiting.” he said.

This was not the first time Mr Turnbull, a former Liberal leader, had offered lightly veiled criticism of what Mr Abbott has been saying about IS.

The Prime Minister has said that the threats it poses are among the biggest Australia has ever faced.

But Mr Turnbull said, pointedly, that it was not to be compared with those posed either by Hitler’s army or Tojo’s forces.

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